2010/02/26

The winking portrait brooch

The Adin Museum Of Fairy Tale Artifacts proudly presents:


Pre Victorian painted portrait brooch

"The winking portrait brooch"


Once upon a time... there was a princess who couldn't stop winking. The best doctors in the land were consulted but nobody could cure the princess. Then it was ordained that the man who could cure the princess would marry her. Needless to say, this attracted hundreds and hundreds of fortune seekers but no one could help the winking princess.

Till one day a poor painter came in. He told the king he could trap the wink in a painting. The king, not knowing what else to do decided to let the painter have his way. The painter did as he promissed, then married the princess and they lived on happily ever after.

It is only recently that Adin Museum of Fairy Tale Artifacts discovered this painting in a brooch. When watching really closely you might still see her wink. Chief conservator of the Museum, Mr. Elkan Wijnberg told us that strangely enough once out of the museum the brooch stops winking.

The brooch might still be available for purchase in the museum for a fairy price.

Click the picture for more information on this
Pre Victorian painted portait brooch


(With many thanks to Chaïm for his creative contribution.)


Antiqualy yours,
The Adin team
www.adin.be



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2010/02/20

Life is a struggle but your love is my force

The Adin Museum Of Fairy Tale Artifacts proudly presents:

Diamond arrow brooch perforating three solid bars of lapis lazuli


"Life is a struggle but your love is my force"


Our latest theme, the “once upon a time” sequence seems to be stirring up romantic inspiration among our readers. One of them had himself inspired by the pictured brooch to write the following romantic fairy tale...

Once upon a time... there was a poor paladin with a pure heart who's name is forgotten long time ago but the memories to him remain intact. The poor paladin loved and was loved in secret by the princess of seas and lands. To reach her kingdom and be blessed by her beauty forever, 3 massive walls had to be conquered. Trust, Faith and Loyalty were their names. The paladin overtook these obstacles with persistence and finally reached the princess to spend the rest of their lives together in loving harmony. This brooch immortalizes the paladin's journey.

With many thanks to François!


Click the picture for more information on this
Diamond arrow brooch perforating three solid bars of lapis lazuli.


Antiqualy yours,
The Adin team
www.adin.be




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2010/02/12

Agnes Sorel, the link between jewelry and food

The Adin Museum Of Fairy Tale Artifacts proudly presents:

Victorian romantic brooch pendant with painted miniature of Agnes Sorel on ivory and paste stones


The link between jewelry and food

Once upon a time... long long time ago, somewhere in the 15th Century, there was a woman at the French court who introduced a trend that some 600 years later would bring Janet Jackson legal trouble.

True, but we only have one charming reason to believe that the woman depicted in this 19th Century brooch/pendant is Agnès Sorel (1422 – 1450). Agnès Sorel was twenty years old when she was first introduced to King Charles. At that time, she was holding a position in the household of Rene I of Naples, Charles' brother-in-law. As reflected in art of the day, she was an extraordinarily beautiful young woman, and was also extremely intelligent. The French king was immediately smitten by her charms and took her as his mistress; he even gave her the Château de Loches (where he had been persuaded by Joan of Arc to be crowned King of France) as her private residence. She entered the French court in 1444 and introduced the single bare-breasted decolletage becoming a real trendsetter for many noble ladies following her example.

For reasons we do not know of, several dishes are named after her (a real attacker is the Agnès Sorel Cream Soup). She really got noticed; not a bad achievement for a woman who lived so long ago for such a short period of time.






Antiqualy yours,
The Adin team
www.adin.be


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2010/02/07

How to tell a True Princess?

The Adin Museum Of Fairy Tale Artifacts proudly presents:

Truly magnificent Art Deco clip, typical Japonism, coral and carre cut onyx


How to tell a True Princess?

Once upon a time... there was a queen-mother that wanted to check if her future daughter-in-law was the real princess she claimed to be.

She went into the bed-room and hid there a beautiful Art Deco clip. In the morning the princess was asked how she had slept. "Oh, very badly!" said she. "I hardly closed my eyes all night. I felt a presence of sheer beauty."

Nobody but a real princess could be as sensitive as that!

So the prince took her for his wife, for now he knew that he had a 'real' princess; and the clip was put in the Adin Museum of Fairy Tale Artifacts, where it may still be seen, provided no one has bought it!




Antiqualy yours,
The Adin team
www.adin.be


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2010/02/03

What was Napoleon holding in his right hand?



The Adin Museum Of Fairy Tale Artifacts reveals historic secret:

Truly magnificent Art Deco clip, typical Japonism, coral and carre cut onyx


What was Nappy holding in his right hand?


Once upon a time... it must have been shortly before Valentine's day when Napoleon's court painter took an instant snapshot of the emperor when he was on his way to the woman he loved. Napoleon with the jewel in his right hand, in a reflex, hid the jewel under his waistcoat.

For a long time the existence of this jewel has been a source of dispute between jewelry historians around the world. It's only shortly that Mr. Elkan Wijnberg, chief conservator of the Adin Antique Jewelry Museum of Fairy Tale Artifacts revealed what it was.

Mr. Wijnberg told us: "Napoleon, being way ahead of his time, loved jewelry from the 1950's. And what was better then to express his emotions to the woman of his dreams then by offering her a pendant with the romantic text: 'Because I love you more and more each day, today more than yesterday but less than tomorrow'. It is not a public secret that Napoleon, a man of little words, prefered to speak French above English thus the text was translated into '+ qu'hier et - que demain'."

Now it is with great pride and ultimate joy that the Adin Antique Jewelry Museum of Fairy Tale Artifacts exibits the actual piece of jewelry that Napoleon held in his right hand on this picture.




Antiqualy yours,
The Adin team
www.adin.be


P.s. Perhaps you know someone who might be interested in receiving our mails? Forward them this mail and they can subscribe themselves at: our subscription page